Kooloonbung Creek Flying Fox Irrigation System Operation

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Consultation has concluded

Kooloonbung Creek flying-fox camp (the camp) is mainly occupied by grey-headed flying-fox (GHFF), and at times by black flying-fox (BFF) and the highly transient little red flying-fox (LRFF). All three species of flying-foxes, and their habitats, are protected under NSW legislation. The GHFF is also listed as Vulnerable under Commonwealth legislation, affording it additional protection.

The camp is located within Kooloonbung Creek Nature Park in Port Macquarie, along an estuarine waterway that includes Wrights Creek. The camp is bordered by residential areas to the east, west and south, a historical cemetery and recreational area adjoin the Park in the north. Kooloonbung Creek camp meets the criteria for a Nationally Important camp under the Referral Guidelines for Management Actions in GHFF and SFF camps (DoE 2015) as it has contained over 10,000 GHFF for two consecutive years and 2,500 permanently or seasonally every year for the last 10 years (OEH 2017).

Living near a flying-fox camp can be challenging for communities, with impacts associated with noise, odour, faecal drop, damage to vegetation and concern about potential health risks. There are also challenges associated with management. State approval is required under legislation to manage a camp, and actions which may affect the GHFF must also adhere to federal policy.

Council installed a trial of 27 (total) canopy mounted sprinklers in one location to create a buffer to help mitigate these challenges. Sprinklers are considered a level two action (creation of buffers) in the OEH Flying-fox Camp Code of Practice 2015.

The trial irrigation system was to help mitigate the impacts of flying fox roosting throughout the day in close proximity to residents by creating further distance between the camp and residents directly adjacent to the Kooloonbung Creek Reserve.

Manual operation of the system is undertaken each week day from 7am subject to calm weather conditions.

It is important to be aware that the irrigation system is not intended to disperse the camp or to mitigate the impacts for residents who are not directly adjacent to the reserve.

Your assistance in completing the survey below will assist Council in measuring the actual and perceived benefits for residents in proximity to Kooloonbung Creek Flying Fox Camp through operation of the irrigation system.

Kooloonbung Creek flying-fox camp (the camp) is mainly occupied by grey-headed flying-fox (GHFF), and at times by black flying-fox (BFF) and the highly transient little red flying-fox (LRFF). All three species of flying-foxes, and their habitats, are protected under NSW legislation. The GHFF is also listed as Vulnerable under Commonwealth legislation, affording it additional protection.

The camp is located within Kooloonbung Creek Nature Park in Port Macquarie, along an estuarine waterway that includes Wrights Creek. The camp is bordered by residential areas to the east, west and south, a historical cemetery and recreational area adjoin the Park in the north. Kooloonbung Creek camp meets the criteria for a Nationally Important camp under the Referral Guidelines for Management Actions in GHFF and SFF camps (DoE 2015) as it has contained over 10,000 GHFF for two consecutive years and 2,500 permanently or seasonally every year for the last 10 years (OEH 2017).

Living near a flying-fox camp can be challenging for communities, with impacts associated with noise, odour, faecal drop, damage to vegetation and concern about potential health risks. There are also challenges associated with management. State approval is required under legislation to manage a camp, and actions which may affect the GHFF must also adhere to federal policy.

Council installed a trial of 27 (total) canopy mounted sprinklers in one location to create a buffer to help mitigate these challenges. Sprinklers are considered a level two action (creation of buffers) in the OEH Flying-fox Camp Code of Practice 2015.

The trial irrigation system was to help mitigate the impacts of flying fox roosting throughout the day in close proximity to residents by creating further distance between the camp and residents directly adjacent to the Kooloonbung Creek Reserve.

Manual operation of the system is undertaken each week day from 7am subject to calm weather conditions.

It is important to be aware that the irrigation system is not intended to disperse the camp or to mitigate the impacts for residents who are not directly adjacent to the reserve.

Your assistance in completing the survey below will assist Council in measuring the actual and perceived benefits for residents in proximity to Kooloonbung Creek Flying Fox Camp through operation of the irrigation system.